Major

Exercise Science - PrePhysical Therapy

Degree Name

Bachelor of Science

Date of Graduation

Spring 2019

Abstract

In the world of exercise prescription there are two major protocols that are used to test an individual’s aerobic capacity at a submaximal intensity using a stationary bicycle. These protocols require participants to exercise at a constant work rate until a specified hear rate is reached. Data can then be analyzed to determine the participant’s aerobic capacity. The objective of this literature review is to look at these two tests – the Åstrand-Rhyming cycle ergometer test (ARCET) and the YMCA cycle ergometer test – and determine if one is better than the other for different populations and which one an exercise professional should choose when working with patients. The literature that is currently out there has validated both tests as good predictions for aerobic capacity when compared to a full maximal exertion test. A primary area that both tests fall short in is predicting aerobic capacity in ethnicities other than those that were used to build the protocol during development. This typically causes a higher error in prediction for populations such as African-Americans compared to Caucasian populations. Although there is little research directly comparing the two tests together, the current literature points towards the YMCA test having a higher degree of accuracy in its predictions when compared to the ARCET. However, either test can be used in a fitness or clinical setting to predict a patient’s aerobic capacity with the knowledge that there will be some degree in error.

Research Sponsor

Dr. Rachele Kappler

First Reader

Dr. Ronald Otterstetter

Second Reader

Stacey Buser

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.