Event Title

Using Institutional Repositories to Foster Access to Special Collections Materials

Start Date

18-5-2020 11:00 AM

End Date

18-5-2020 11:50 AM

Document Type

Presentation

Description

Institutional repositories are traditionally understood as self-archiving platforms which collect, preserve, and disseminate the scholarly output of an institution. Marshall University has previously used their institutional repository, Marshall Digital Scholar (MDS), to host articles by faculty and graduate students, historic materials created by the university, and modern university publications and proceedings. Recently, the Marshall University Archive and Special Collections has expanded their contributions to include finding aids for manuscript collections, digital exhibits, and other complex digital objects. As a result, the Special Collections page is on point to more than double its total downloads in 2019. Special Collections has had an average of 5,611 downloads each year for the previous six years. This session will discuss the project for making these materials accessible, including the interdepartmental collaboration between Special Collections, Cataloging & Metadata, and Scholarly Communications departments, advantages of using an institutional repository over the library catalog, metadata choices, data wrangling and organization, and future directions. Implications for the project include increased findability and accessibility of special collections materials for a more diverse set of users, including researchers, scholars, and community members.

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May 18th, 11:00 AM May 18th, 11:50 AM

Using Institutional Repositories to Foster Access to Special Collections Materials

Institutional repositories are traditionally understood as self-archiving platforms which collect, preserve, and disseminate the scholarly output of an institution. Marshall University has previously used their institutional repository, Marshall Digital Scholar (MDS), to host articles by faculty and graduate students, historic materials created by the university, and modern university publications and proceedings. Recently, the Marshall University Archive and Special Collections has expanded their contributions to include finding aids for manuscript collections, digital exhibits, and other complex digital objects. As a result, the Special Collections page is on point to more than double its total downloads in 2019. Special Collections has had an average of 5,611 downloads each year for the previous six years. This session will discuss the project for making these materials accessible, including the interdepartmental collaboration between Special Collections, Cataloging & Metadata, and Scholarly Communications departments, advantages of using an institutional repository over the library catalog, metadata choices, data wrangling and organization, and future directions. Implications for the project include increased findability and accessibility of special collections materials for a more diverse set of users, including researchers, scholars, and community members.