Date of Graduation

Spring 2018

Document Type

Honors Research Project

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts in Education

Major

Adolescent to Young Adult - Integrated Mathematics

Research Sponsor

Dr. Lynne M. Pachnowski

First Reader

Dr. Linda Saliga

Second Reader

Dr. Shelley Houser

Abstract

This paper discusses the relationship between the presence of birth parents in a student’s home life and their grade last semester in mathematics. Our[1] study consisted of two sets of rosters from two different urban high schools in a large metropolitan district. The 238 students involved are currently enrolled in either AP Calculus AB, Pre-calculus, Applied Statistics, Algebra II, Honors Geometry, or Geometry. The research showed that 30.8% of students who live with only their birth mother received an A or a B for the semester while 17.5% percent failed their mathematics course. In contrast, 58.4% percent of students who live with both of their birth parents earned an A or a B and only 10.1% of them failed their mathematics course for the semester. I was able to conclude at a 1 percent significance level that students living with both of their birth parents are more likely to earn an A or a B in their mathematics course than students living with just one of their birth parents. Furthermore, at a 10 percent significance level, there is sufficient evidence to draw the conclusion that it is less likely for a student who lives with both of their birth parents to fail their mathematics course than it is for a student who lives with just their birth mother. Therefore, the data seems to imply a definite correlation between the presence of birth parents in the homes of students and the students’ grades.

[1] This study was completed with one other person, Cailyn Rowan.

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